Fix Peeling Nails

How to Treat and Prevent Flaky, Peeling Nails

Some people love that peel-off style nail polish, but I'd venture to say that most people don't love it when their actual nails peel. Peeling nails can be caused by certain medical conditions and even some prescriptions, but what can you do in everyday life to prevent your fingernails from going all flaky on you? Find out more in my ultracool, easy-to-follow chart when you keep reading.

The problem The solution:
Dry air or overexposure to water have wreaked havoc. Perhaps you wash your hands a lot, or you live in a drier climate. Your nails can even become more brittle with age as natural oils begin to diminish. Whatever the case, consider wearing gloves while doing the dishes, and frequently rub a hand lotion or nail oil right onto your nail beds, like Nailtiques Oil Therapy ($12).
You've got the wrong kind of file. File in only one direction, avoid metal nail files, and look for filers with a fine grit — 180 or above.
Poor diet is the culprit. Eat a well-rounded diet of veggies, fruits, leafy greens, and proteins. Also consider supplements that include vitamins A, C, D, and E, folic acid, calcium, Omega-3 fats, biotin, iron, zinc, iodine, and the B-complex vitamins.
Chemicals and harsh ingredients are not so appealing. Avoid polishes that contain formaldehyde, toluene, and DBP, and stay away from acetone-based removers, which can be harsh and drying to the nails. Also, wear gloves if exposed to chemicals when cleaning. Tip: Before painting your nails, use a strengthening coat to seal in moisture and protect the nails, such as Nail-Aid Peeling Nail Intense Repair Gel ($6.50).
You think your nails can do it all. Don't think of your nails as tools that can work to pry open hard-to-get-into bottles or pesky CD covers. Instead, focus that energy on buffing your nails to help form a protective, smooth, and shiny finish to your nails, as well as to seal up your free edge.
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