Most people haven't heard of rolfing massages, but hip young New Yorkers are flocking to the painful but ostensibly beneficial technique. Rolfing, which can help with everything from flexibility to chronic injuries, was popular in the '70s. The alternative physical therapy works to smooth out the body's connective tissue, alleviating muscle pain and stretching tendons. However, rolfing can also be excruciating because the technique involves lots of poking and kneading, and there's no established evidence that it's any more beneficial than traditional massage, yoga, or chiropractics. Have you ever been rolfed, and if you haven't, would you consider suffering in the name of better health?